InFocus Film School Blog

 

What Makes Vancouver So Good for Movies?

InFocus Film School - Filming in Vancouver: A Cinematographers Guide

Written by Freddie Kim

 

Shooting in Vancouver has become a haven for film and television. Vancouver is considered a premier location, and was affectionately given the nickname “Hollywood North.” But what artistic edge does it have over other major cities? Here are 5 factors that differentiate shooting in Vancouver.

High Latitude For More Sun

Vancouver’s higher latitude means extended daytime shooting hours during summer–­ a huge boon for productions shooting on a tight timeline. During peak filming season, Vancouver gets up to 16 hours of daylight, two hours more than Los Angeles, yet avoids the southern California heat during summer.

Extended “Golden” Hours

With softer light, ideal lighting ratios and a warmer colour, the “golden” or “magic” hour after sunrise and before sunset is often the best time to shoot. In any given season, the sun in Vancouver remains lower on the horizon than in most US cities, giving Vancouver a magic hour that is actually way longer than one hour, and often spectacular for more than two.

InFocus Film School - Film Production Program

Cloudy Weather Means Great Diffusion

Vancouver often has a thick cloud cover that diffuses light. Harsh sunlight pouring above your subjects is complicated to control and a sky sprinkled with clouds is a nightmare due to constantly changing light. Cloudy grey skies make for constant lighting conditions and a much easier shoot.

Mild Winters Allow Year-Round Shooting

Although Vancouverites love to complain about it, rain isn’t always a bad thing. Our mild winters and lack of snow allow for a nearly year-round shooting window. Although uncomfortable to hold a shoot in the rain, it often doesn’t read on camera and can easily look moody, arty, and unlike anything that LA can offer.

Clean Air and Unfiltered Sunlight

Compared to popular American film locations, Vancouver’s air pollution is low. Cleaner air means a larger spectrum of unfiltered sunlight. In places with heavy pollution, sunlight may come pre­filtered and muted, negating much of its artistic usefulness. The lack of pollution during sunrise or sunset provides a gorgeous broad spectrum in Vancouver­ and exquisite backdrops.

Why Should New Directors Make Horror Films?

Written by Johnny Papan

 

Horror isn’t a genre often associated with prestige. In fact, only 6 freaky films have ever been nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, the most recent being Jordan Peele’s directorial debut: Get Out. Despite this, as was the case with Peele, horror films have proven to be a launching pad for many of the world’s most renowned filmmakers. James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Sam Raimi, Stephen Spielberg, and even Frances Ford Coppola have all honed their craft making horror films in their early career.

There are a multitude of reasons why this genre is a great place to develop your career as a film director. From the freedom to experiment, to lower financial risk, to a dedicated fanbase and beyond, here are our top 5 reasons why new directors should begin their career in horror.

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Written by Clarence Sponagle

Martha; A Picture Story is a documentary reminding us that one passion can lead to others, one person’s drive can be addictive and that some of the best storytelling is through art.

 

Martha Cooper is a photographer whose pictures of hip-hop graffiti helped share the art-form all over the world. What started off as a conventional hobby turned into a revolutionary career that is still going today, at her age of 75. In the 1970s Martha discovered graffiti art in the Bronx and began taking photos, turning her collection into a book entitled Subway Art. Though the book sold few copies in the 1970s, some were shoplifted and photocopied. Pirated copies of the book were circulated internationally and turned the art-form into a worldwide phenomena.

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AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH HEAVY HITTING HORRORFEST’S FUNNY AND UNPREDICTABLE FESTIVAL DIRECTOR: FEET BANKS

Written by Johnny Papan

 

Whistler’s Heavy Hitting HorrorFest describes itself as a “one night, balls to the wall orgy of horrific, hilarious, and very independent short films.” Their website cautions attendees to “tell your brain to stock up on diapers.”

This now 13-year-old festival has grown into one of the largest and longest running horror festivals in Western Canada. This years festival aims for a more “intimate vibe,” screening at a 300 person theatre, as opposed to multiple theatres hosting 1200 attendees as seen in the past. Event organizer Feet Banks says this will not stop the festival from being “bigger, bloodier, and even more badass than ever before.” The even will feature a Red Carpet pre-party and costumes are encouraged.

The festival accepts film from around the world, and the deadline is September 15. Feet spoke with InFocus Film School about the festival, its origins, and some wild tidbits. Read the EXCLUSIVE Q&A below.

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Lighting at InFocus Film School

 

Lighting is a crucial part of the filmmaking experience. It gives films a special look and style that can be unique to the piece in question. It affects the tone, mood, and can subconsciously control the audience’s emotion as well.

Understanding fundamental lighting is extremely important. Whether you are a lighting expert, or stepping in behind the camera for the first time, here are 3 tips you MUST know as a cinematographer.

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By Victor van der Merwe

The world of visual effects is becoming an ever more crucial part of the film industry. CGI and 3D modelling is not just for monster movies and aliens anymore and as movies evolve, it is amazing to see what the visual effects departments can do. Having an actor fly on a dragon is impressive, but what can be even more amazing is subtle changes a person in the VFX department can make to make fabricated scenes look realistic. Here are five films that subtly use special effects to enhance their stories.

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By Ryan Uytdewilligen

What’s the motivation for your movie’s location?

If you are going make your on-screen dream a reality, you’ll need actors, props, a screenplay, and a crew. But you can’t forget the most important physical aspect… the very bane that plagues all movie shoots; an answer to the pesky question, “where are we going to film?”

A shooting space can make or break everything depending on many minuscule factors. The job takes talent so that the rest of the crew’s day can run smoothly and the desired scene can be captured with ease.

Here’s the process one should take when finding and securing that sacred shooting space.

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Acclaimed director and film school graduate Ang Lee said: “If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you can never learn enough.” That is especially true when it comes to film.

The benefits of a formal filmmaking education cannot be overstated. It gives young directors, cinematographers, screenwriters, and other aspiring artists the guidance and training they need to master their craft. A number of the most well-known and successful directors have gotten started at film school. It gave them a chance to develop their unique artistic style and voice.

Read on to find out how film school influenced the work of these three famous directors.

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Written by Ryan Uytdewilligen

 

To film school or not to film school, that is the question! The budding filmmakers of tomorrow are faced with this weighty choice – rush out into the world and make movies on their own or take the time to get a formal education.

 

It’s a risky business seeing how job security at the end of your education is far from guaranteed. A quote from the much loved auteur Quentin Tarantino simply spells out for young filmmakers that “he never went to film school, he went to films” yet respected and renowned director Martin Scorsese as well Hollywood mogul George Lucas have both learned their crafts in an educational setting.

 

So where is the best place to start? If you’re scratching your head and looking for that launching pad, look no further. A diploma may not necessarily be a requirement for stepping on set, however, receiving a formal education in the field might conjure up more opportunities than you many think.

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Written by Victor van der Merwe

 

The one thing all filmmakers have in common is the problem of finding money for a project. Steven Spielberg has that problem, David Lynch has that problem and yes, first time filmmakers have that problem. The reason is because, unlike other art forms, this is a very expensive medium to work in. Of course, Spielberg and Lynch can point out projects that prove they can get the money back to investors. Sadly, your profit margins might not yet compare to theirs. This does not mean that you cannot raise the funds needed to make your masterpiece though. Here are five ways new filmmakers can get funding for their projects.

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