katniss everdeen in the film adaptation of hunger games mockingjay

by Henry Kulick

 

Film adaptations aren’t easy, but they do accelerate a major step in the creative process—crafting a completely unique story.

 

With a written work to rely on, the outlines of the screenplay already exist, but only with some much-needed tweaking can it become ready for film. Sometimes this means something as simple as altering of the main character’s interaction with another, or it can mean the removal of entire portions of the narrative.

 

More than anything, when moving from page to screen, a screenwriter must be aware of thoughts and actions—specifically, how they impact the viewer. Because what a book can achieve by slipping into the mind of a character and allowing the reader to hear every thought, a movie can only do by showing what the character does and believing the viewer will understand why.

 

From young adult novels to detective noirs, understanding the mind of our character is absolutely necessary for empathizing and experiencing the story along with them. So how can that written understanding effectively translate to film?

Read more

VIFF Sustainable Production Forum

by Ryan Uytdewilligen

 

When you marvel at the scope of the latest popcorn movie, a few occasional questions such as “how did they ever do that?” might arise. That’s most likely what the filmmakers wanted you to think.

 

But few moviegoers actually consider or investigate the nitty-gritty reality of how much goes into creating a scene, whether it’s faking weather conditions or carving realistic worlds with the hands of cinema’s finest set builders.

 

The answer is a lot: a lot of money and a heck of a lot of material to make it so. If a scene requires rain, water is often pumped through rain towers to create that illusion. Structures large and small are often constructed for one day of shooting and then the materials tossed away like it was never so.

 

Then there’s the world you can’t see on screen: the endless parade of trailers and trucks filled with makeup and scripts to the pop up restaurants that feed the army of hungry crew. It takes a village and then some to make a movie.

 

Read more

IT 2017 film adaptation scene original by stephen king

by Henry Kulick

 

After its over 30-year mark on the world of storytelling, IT is no stranger to most of us. Whether it was the original Stephen King novel, the 1990 miniseries, or the newest iteration, the 2017 film adaptation, IT is a pulse-pounding story about facing our greatest fears, no matter how terrifying that may be. And that we could always use a little help from our friends.

 

But for the first time, under the directorial eye of Andy Muschietti, IT breaks out of the horror genre to become something more—a dark fantasy that may be the best Stephen King adaptation to date.

 

Read more

commercials by famous directors ridley scott michael bay david fincher

By Christopher McKittrick

 

Like nearly all film school students, you probably dream of helming a multi-million dollar Hollywood blockbuster… except at the moment you’re finding it difficult to come up with those millions to spend on your vision.

 

In the film industry (as in any industry), working your way up to the top is a time-honoured tradition. One way you can build your career is by displaying your talent with some of the shortest narrative films there are: commercials.

 

Many successful filmmakers like David Fincher, Zack Snyder, Michael Bay, and Ridley Scott and entire animation studios like Pixar spent their earliest years making commercials, which soon led to more exposure and greater opportunities. In fact, two of the estimated 2000 commercials that Scott directed – his 1973 spot for Hovis bread and his 1984 Super Bowl spot for Apple – have been cited by many in the industry as two of the most influential television commercials in advertising history.

 

Read more

production logos creative producing

By Ryan Uytdewilligen

 

For most movie goers, when the credits roll, the producer names are unrecognizable and their overall duty on the picture isn’t quite clear. But their involvement must be integrally important seeing as how they tend to be Hollywood’s richest and take home top prize at the Oscars, right?

 

The stereotypical image for many might be a tightly wound fat man in a suit, chomping down on a cigar and barking orders at frightened malnourished writers. But nothing could be further from the truth.

Read more